The girl who came in from the cold


I  am going to christen this blogzine  by honestly admitting that I was one of the people who pulled a wry grin  when people talked about tweeting and blogging and I own up to my once limited knowledge of its uses and aspirations and would like to, hopefully,  discuss this further in the article below.  I also welcome any comments that you have to support or to dispel my beliefs.

I am a very recent convert to the world of tweets and blogs. I had assumed in a very closed-minded manner that to blog, micro or otherwise, was the akin to standing on your soapbox and shouting at the world demanding attention and insisting that people listen to your beliefs and views. I thought that it was all about achieving that all important fifteen minutes of fame, and that it was just another tool wielded by media moguls trying to invade my precious personal space and time.

Feel free to sneer and scoff at me for my apparently sudden change of heart, as I now tweet regularly and have my own blogzine! If it hadn’t been for my new marketing role at work I don’t think that I would be here doing this now. I have spent that last month using and researching social media and networks and can see their many and varied uses for both individuals and organisations. Through my Twitter accounts and my blogs I have access to an enormous resource of up to the minute information and opinion and I also have the power to share this information immediately with others. There are numerous ways in which membership to social network services can benefit us all in our search for information and like-minded individuals. Through these networks we can connect with people from all over them world and from all walks of life etc. But, there is always a ‘but’.

I propose that even though there are a multitude of benefits to the use of social media services there are a number of pitfalls also. The sharing of information in an open and honest manner is a wonderful ideal, but can’t it also be hazardous even when used as intended? I am a firm believer in the freedom of speech and of the press, but there can also be too much of a good thing, as my grandmother says, and if we submit to the flood of information do we learn more and think more, or do we become hardened to the morass and stand aloof and unmoved by it all? Every means that links people together is always going to have a negative element, but do we worry about this element or not?

My idealism wants me to believe that tweeting and blogging can bring people with similar interests, hopes and dreams etc. together and that it can bridge boundaries and forge friendships around the world. In Twitter-land all people are created equal and all have an equal right to tweet and be tweeted to. By being informed about the world and its people we will be better members of society. But realistically I don’t believe that social media can measurably improve society as a whole in any way. I can assure you that it will benefit the lives of many individuals, but we are unlikely to see social reform through the use of such media.

The fact that we now have access to so much more information than in precious years enables us to understand the world around us and make more informed decisions about our lives and our beliefs etc. But, I believe that it can also enable us to feel that we ‘know’ other sections of society and peoples, and this will then ‘allow’ us to make judgements on these groups. I think that too much information is just as damaging as too little.

On a more flippant note, I am already finding that I receive more information than I can successfully read and comfortably absorb each day, and this builds a new frustration in my life. But this irritation can be soothed by the fact that I can write a blog about it and post it on the Internet for anyone who chooses to read it.

Here I stand on my soapbox shouting at the world!

What do you think? To blog or not to blog?

Paige

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Comments
2 Responses to “The girl who came in from the cold”
  1. lowsaltfoods says:

    Social media has its uses but it is still essentially information. Real social reform involves real hard work and real relationships. In a way, blogging, tweeting, facebook, etc can be just like pornography in that it simulates a feeling (not necessarily the same feeling) that can only be obtained through effort. It’s has the potential to be just as addictive And, ultimately, it has the potential to be just as counterproductive. Maybe it’s a government conspiracy – the more we are blogging or tweeting about our lives and what’s wrong with the world, the less we are actually doing anything to change things, which suits our masters just fine.

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  1. […] The girl who came in from the cold (via Paige Lucken’s blogzine) What’s more ironic than not really remembering on Remembrance Day? A blogger blogging about the ultimate pointlessness of blogging…a thought provoking but quite agreeable piece.. I  am going to christen this blogzine  by honestly admitting that I was one of the people who pulled a wry grin  when people talked about tweeting and blogging and I own up to my once limited knowledge of its uses and aspirations and would like to, hopefully,  discuss this further in the article below.  I also welcome any comments that you have to support or to dispel my beliefs. I am a very recent convert to the world of tweets and blogs. I had … Read More […]



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